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Shape-changing enzyme suggests how small doses of anti-HIV drug might treat Alzheimer's

NIST, 28 June 2016 (sciencedaily) - Molecular roadmap provides key evidence supporting proposal to launch clinical trials of efavirenz as an Alzheimer's treatment

 

at the site shown in orange, it increases the flexibility of the protein in the region (magenta) around cholesterol (green). Regions with no changes are shown in grey and iron-containing heme in black.

 

ART use averting huge numbers of opportunistic infections among children living with HIV in lower-income countries

BOSTON, 27 June 2016 (aidsmap) - There has been a decrease in cases of many opportunistic infections (OIs) among children living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries thanks to antiretroviral therapy (ART), a meta-analysis published in the June 15th edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases shows. Investigators estimated that use of ART is averting over 161,000 opportunistic infections each year, saving $17 million per annum.

Africa: EAC Has 10 Percent of New HIV Cases - Report

ARUSHA, 28 June 2016 (allAfrica)  - The East African region has 10 per cent of all new HIV infections globally, according to the 2014 UNAIDS report.

SAfAIDS Young4Real…Her Journey to Success

Princess Sibanda is one of the SAfAIDS Brand Ambassadors under the Young4Real Programme. She had the opportunity to interact with young people from the Provinces that SAfAIDS implements the Young4Real Programme, which works to equip young people with skills that will enable them to embrace their Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights with responsibility.

Soft-core pornography may fuel negativity toward women, endorse rape myths

NOTTINGHAM, 18 June 2016 (medicalnewstoday) - Individuals who often look at photographs of semi-naked women and other forms of soft-core pornography may become desensitized to such images, hold more negative attitudes toward women, and endorse myths about rape, suggests a new study.

People who inject drugs have other priorities ahead of PrEP

BANGKOK, 17 June 2016 (aidsmap) - People who inject drugs have fundamental concerns about HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis and the manner in which it being promoted, according to a consultation conducted by the International Network of People who Use Drugs (INPUD). With limited availability of harm reduction services, poor access to HIV treatment and little progress on legal reform, respondents suggested that people who inject drugs have more pressing needs than PrEP. One activist commented:

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