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HIV and AIDS Codes, Laws and Declarations

This is the HIV and AIDS Codes, Laws and Declarations section.

 


Related publications:

Malawi National HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan 2011-2016

 

The Malawi National  HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan (NSP 2011 – 2016) is a follow up of the National HIV and AIDS Action Framework (NAF 2005– 2009), which was extended to 2011. The NSP seeks to provide continued guidance to the national response to HIV and AIDS, building to work done in the past decade. It is informed by the findings of the Community and Stakeholder consultations the National HIV and AIDS Policy Review (March 2001), the Malawi Growth and Development strategy (2011 – 2016) and the Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSP) 2011– 2016; as well as developments in medical and scientific knowledge.

 

Translating Rhetoric into Reality: Implementing HIV policies in Swaziland and Zambia: A synopsis of key findings

This document summarises the fi ndings of research by SAfAIDS on implementation of regional and international HIV prevention, treatment, care and support conventions and declarations in Swaziland and Zambia. The goal of the assessment was “to assess the extent to which the Governments of Swaziland and Zambia have eff ectively implemented HIV and AIDS prevention, care, treatment and support strategies in line with the major international commitments and declarations to which they are signatories”.

Implementation of HIV prevention, treatment, care and support Conventions and Declarations in Swaziland and Zambia

This report highlights SAfAIDS’ findings on the implementation of regional and international HIV prevention, treatment, care and support conventions and declarations in Swaziland and Zambia. The assessment, which used qualitative methods to collect data on various HIV and AIDS services, used literature review and consultative meetings and key informant interviews with key stakeholders and focus group discussions with users of services and their representative organisations. SAfAIDS put together technical teams in the two countries comprised of an independent researcher, SAfAIDS staff and an in-country partner organisation identified to conduct the assessment.

African Civil Society position paper on HIV and AIDS in Africa: Moving to Action

We, African civil society organizations comprising organizations and networks of people living with HIV, young people, women, religious leaders and community workers at the frontline of the fight against AIDS, met in Abuja, Nigeria on April 10 to 12 2006 to develop a consolidated position for use during the review processes of the Abuja Declaration and Framework Plan for action, and the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on AIDS (UNGASS) Declaration of Commitment (DoC), and to chart a way forward regarding access for all people requiring information and services related to

HIV prevention, care, support and treatment. This statement reflects the outcomes of these deliberations, as well as the sentiments of the undersigned African Civil Society Organisations.

Johannesburg Declaration of the 3rd Ordinary Session of the AU Conference on Ministers of Health, J'burg, S.A, 9-13 April 2007

Johannesburg Declaration of the 3rd Ordinary Session of the AU Conference on Ministers of Health,  J'burg, S.A, 9-13 April 2007

 

We, Ministers of Health of the African Union, meeting at the 3rd Ordinary Session of our conference in Johannesburg, South Africa, 9 -13 April 2007 under the theme Strengthening of Health Systems for Equity and Development”;

Implementation of Regional and International HIV and AIDS Conventions and Declarations in Lesotho, Malawi and Mozambique

OSISA and SAfAIDS, Implementation of Regional and International HIV and AIDS Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support Conventions and Declarations in Lesotho, Malawi and Mozambique, SAfAIDS, Harare, 2008.

 

This study examines the extent to which the Governments of Lesotho,Malawi and Mozambique have implemented HIV and AIDS prevention, treatment, care, support and impact mitigation strategies and services in line with current international and regional conventions and declarations to which they are signatories.A Declaration refers to a statement of moral and ethical intent,which despite being an instrument that is not legally binding, provides an undeniable moral force and practical guidance to states in their conduct.A Convention on the other hand is defined as a moral and ethical intent which has both a legal as well as a moral obligation for its signatories and carries the weight of international law which is applicable to States that ratify or accede to it.

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