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Advocacy

This is the Advocacy section.

 


Related publications:

“I Know, Do you Know?” Campaign in South Africa

The SAfAIDS “I Know, Do you Know?” Campaign for #EndingAdolescentsAIDS in South Africa is targeted at generating increased debate and discussion on the importance of knowing one’s HIV status as an entry point for HIV prevention, treatment, adherence, care and psycho-social support. The campaign will serve as a platform to mobilize Adolescents to take up HIV testing and treatment, encourage uptake of other combination prevention programmes like Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision and offer Psychosocial support associated with adolescent disclosure as well as provision of family planning services for those who require them.

Changing the River’s Flow - A gender Transformative Programme for Young People (CTRF 4 YP) (2015-2017)

Zimbabwe is mainly a patriarchal society in which boys and girls are taught from early childhood to internalize societal messages about how males and females are expected to behave, who makes decisions, and where power dynamics lie. These behaviors contribute to reinforcing unequal gender roles and responsibilities that culminate into high risk of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases.

Changing the River’s Flow - A gender Transformative Programme for Young People (CTRF 4 YP) (2015-2017)

Zimbabwe is mainly a patriarchal society in which boys and girls are taught from early childhood to internalize societal messages about how males and females are expected to behave, who makes decisions, and where power dynamics lie. These behaviors contribute to reinforcing unequal gender roles and responsibilities that culminate into high risk of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases. Such norms among young men and boys include early sexual activity, multiple sex partners, gender based violence and sexual dominance that increase vulnerability to contracting and spreading HIV. Despite growing understanding that gender transformation, including shifting gender power dynamics and norms are critical to realizing sexual and reproductive health, very few interventions have attempted to effectively address these norms in a sustainable and large scale fashion

“Amai wevana ava varikupi? ” (Where are the mothers of these children)

In the past two weeks the newspapers have been filled with the headlines that reflect a generation that we are failing to understand. Are we the adults falling behind with the times or are we neglecting our children, to allow them to be attacked by the sexual nuances of modern entertainment and at the mercy of child abusers? These headlines include: two boys who were charged with sodomy, 28 children arrested for attending a nude party in Westgate, Harare and the reduction of the age of sexual consent to 12 years old.

Swaziland: Giving young people a voice

SAfAIDS in partnership with the Family Life Association implemented a Sexual Reproductive Health ( SRH) national dialogue on Family Planning for young people. The dialogue brought together 30 young people from different organisations working with young people to discuss SRH issues affecting them. The organisations included AMICAALL, Super buddies, Swaziland Young Women’s Network (SYWON), Khulisa umntfwana, Rock of hope, FLAS and SWANNEPHA.

A success story: Surviving Tuberculosis

Masiza Lukhele is an ex-miner who lives in Buseleni - a chiefdom found in Nkwene constituency. He earns a living from keeping poultry in a small scale that helps him keep his family slightly above the poverty datum line. He was diagnosed with TB while working in the dusty tunnels of one of the South African mines. He first enrolled for treatment in Lebanon hospital in the Republic of South Africa and was successful in completing a six months long treatment. During his treatment he was compelled to retire from work.

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